The Accredited Employer Work Visa (“AEWV”) will be introduced on 4 July 2022, and will replace six temporary work visa categories:

  • Essential Skills Work Visa – will close on 3 July 2022;
  • Essential Skills Work Visa – Approval in Principle – will close on 3 July 2022;
  • Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa – will close on 31 October 2021;
  • Long Term Skills Shortage List Work Visa – will close on 31 October 2021;
  • Silver Fern Job Search Visa – closed on 7 October 2021; and
  • Silver Fern Practical Experience Visa – will close on 31 October 2021.

Before hiring a migrant on the Accredited Employer Work Visa, an employer will have to:

  1. apply for accreditation under the new system – “the Employer Check”;
  2. apply for a job check to make sure the role they want to fill cannot be done by New Zealanders – “the Job Check”/“the Labour Market Test”; and
  3. request a migrant worker to apply for a visa – “the Worker Check”.

Why introduce the AEWV

The AEWV will be “employer led” to:

  • reduce exploitation; and
  • improve conditions for New Zealand workers.

It has been, “… designed to support a future economy that is less reliant on lower-paid temporary workers, better addresses productivity, skills and infrastructure challenges, and increases the skill levels of migrants.”

The Employer Check

Any employers accredited under the current system (i.e. in relation to the Talent (Accredited Employer) Work and Resident Visas) will have to apply and meet the policy requirements of the new accreditation system, if they want to hire migrants on the new AEWV.

An employer will be able to start the application process for accreditation on 9 May 2022. A high volume of employer applications is likely, and therefore, there may be processing delays.

There is 3 types of accreditation:

  1. Standard – to hire 5 migrant workers on AEWVs at any one time;
  2. High-volume – to hire 6 or more migrant workers on AEWVs at any one time; and
  3. Other – in relation to Franchisees and Labour Hire Companies.

The Employer Check – Standard Accreditation

ALL employers who want hire migrants on AEWVs have to meet the standard accreditation requirements, which are as follows:

  1. Must be a genuinely operating business, i.e.:
  • Must be registered as an employer with IRD;
  • May have to provide evidence that in sound financial position (be profitable/have a positive cash flow etc.); and
  • If the employer is a partnership or sole trader, the business owner(s) must not be bankrupt or subject to a No Asset Procedure.
  1. Must not have a non-compliance record, i.e.:
  • Not be included in the Labour Inspectorate stand down list;
  • Must be compliant with immigration law and not be subject to a permanent ban following a conviction for an immigration related offence(s);
  • Not be prohibited from being a director; and
  • Must not be a phoenix company.
  1. Must take steps to minimise worker exploitation, i.e.:
  • Provide migrant workers with time to complete Employment Learning Modules;
  • Everyone who makes recruitment decisions must complete Employment Learning Modules;
  • Pay all recruitment costs inside and outside New Zealand, including advertising, agency fees, employer and job check applications, training and induction, health and safety equipment, and uniforms, BUT excluding airfares;
  • Provide migrant workers with work-related information (i.e. how to get an IRD number) and community assistance (i.e. how to open a bank account, find rental accommodation); and
  • Employer cannot receive a premium for employment, unlawfully bond the employee, nor make any unlawful deductions.

The Employer Check – High-Volume Accreditation

Employers who want hire 6 or more migrants on AEWVs have to meet the standard accreditation requirements, AND:

  • Must commit to improving pay and conditions over time;
  • Must either pay the employee at least 10% above the minimum wage OR employee must be included in a collective agreement; and
  • Later, there will be a requirement to show that they have a commitment to train and upskill New Zealanders. The detail is yet to be considered.

The Employer Check – Other Accreditation

Franchisees:

  • Must meet the standard accreditation requirements;
  • Must also meet the high-volume accreditation requirements (if applicable);
  • Must have been operating for at least 12 months; and
  • Must have a history of hiring New Zealanders.

Labour Hire Companies:

  • Must meet the standard accreditation requirements;
  • Must also meet the high-volume accreditation requirements (if applicable);
  • Must place migrants on AEWVs with “compliant businesses”;
    • A “compliant business” is a business:
      • that has an NZBN;
      • that is not on the stand-down list; and
      • has declared that they do not have immigration-related issues.
    • Must have good systems to monitor employment and safety conditions;
    • Must have a 12 month labour contracting history; and
    • Must have at least 15% of the company’s labour workforce placed with third parties be New Zealanders in full-time employment (i.e. at least 30 hours a week).

The Employer Check – Accreditation Period

When an employer is approved by Immigration New Zealand, they will receive accreditation for 12 months.

At renewal, franchisees and employers that want to place migrants on AEWVs with third parties will be granted accreditation for a further 12 months, and all other employers will be granted accreditation for 24 months.

The Job Check/Labour Market Test

A Labour Market Test;

  • Is a genuine attempt to recruit New Zealand citizen or resident, unless on a skill shortage list;
  • Employer must:
    • Find the occupation within ANZSCO that most closely matches the job;
    • Advertise SEEK or Trade Me Jobs (or other large website); and
    • Assess New Zealand citizens or residents who apply for the job.

A Labour Market Test/job check will likely be valid for three months from the date that it is approved.

A Labour Market Test will NOT be required, IF the job will paying:

  • Twice the median wage;
  • At least the median wage in the regions;

IF the job will paying below the median wage, a Labour Market Test will be required. A Skills Match Report with Work and Income will also be required, UNLESS the:

  • Job is on a skill shortage list and the employee meets the list requirements;
  • Job is on an undersupply or oversupply list; or
  • Job is on a regional shortage list.

At the moment, the median wage is $27 per hour.

The Worker Check

The worker must meet:

  • Character;
  • Health; and
  • Credential and experience requirements.

Fees

There will be a fee for EACH check. The employer must pay the:

  • Fee for the Employer Check; and
  • Fee for the Job Check.

The fee for the Worker Check can be paid by either the employer or the employee.

Fees for the AEWV have not yet been announced, but we think they may be $$$ because of Immigration New Zealand’s ballooning deficit.

Duration

The duration of an AEWV will be between one to three years.

If the job is paying below the median wage, the AEWV will be valid for one year.

Variation of Conditions

Like an Essential Skills Work Visa, the AEWV will specify the employer, role and location that the AEWV holder must work for/in.

If the employer will change, but the holder’s role and the location of employment remain the same, it is likely that a variation of conditions will be required.

Pathway to Residence

There will be a pathway to residence for those that hold AEWVs, but they will have to be paid at least 200% of the median wage.

At the moment, the median wage is $27 per hour. So, an AEWV holder will have to be paid at least $54 per hour/$112,320 per year (40 hour week) to have a pathway to residency.

It has not yet been decided when the pathway to residence will be introduced.

We do note that everything above is subject to change as the full policy instructions are not yet available.

Please note that this is not a substitute for legal advice and you should contact your lawyer about your specific situation. Please feel free to contact us on 03 348 8480 or by email to Viv Zhang – VivZhang@parryfield.com and Rebecca Nicholson – RebeccaNicholson@parryfield.com.

On 30 September 2021, the Minister of Immigration announced a “one-off” and “simplified pathway to residence” – the 2021 Resident Visa.

Am I eligible?

To be eligible for the 2021 Resident Visa, you must:

  • have been in New Zealand on 29 September 2021 – we note those in Australia who have not been able return to New Zealand by 29 September 2021 may be eligible; and
  • be on an eligible visa or have applied for an eligible visa on or before 29 September 2021 that is later granted.

You must also:

  • have lived in New Zealand for three or more years; OR
  • earn at or above the median wage (which is $27 per hour); OR
  • work in a role on a scarce list.

You must meet one of the three criteria above – you do not have to meet all three.

Do I have an eligible visa?

Your visa is an eligible visa if it is a:

  • Post Study Work Visa;
  • Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa;
  • Essential Skills Work Visa;
  • Religious Worker Work Visa;
  • Talent (Arts, Culture, Sports) Work Visa;
  • Long Term Skill Shortage List Work Visa;
  • Silver Fern Practical Experience Work Visa;
  • Trafficking Victim Work Visa;
  • Migrant Exploitation Protection Work Visa;
  • Skilled Migrant Category Job Search Work Visa;
  • Victims of Family Violence Work;
  • Visa South Island Contribution Work Visa;
  • Work Visa granted under Section 61 (provided you held another eligible visa type within 6 months before being granted a Section 61 visa); and
  • Critical Purpose Visitor Visa (CPVV) if:
    • You are a critical health worker for a longer term role (6 months or longer); and
    • You are an other critical worker for long term role (longer than 6 months).

You will not be eligible visa if you are in a short term or seasonal role on a Critical Purpose Visitor Visa or are on a:

  • Visitor Visa;
  • Student Visa;
  • Working Holiday Visa;
  • Seasonal Visa (e.g. a Recognised Seasonal Employer Limited Visa); or
  • Partnership-based Work Visa.

Have I lived in New Zealand for three or more years?

You will have lived in New Zealand for the past three or more years if you:

  • arrived in New Zealand on or before 29 September 2018; and
  • have spent a minimum of 821 days in New Zealand between 29 September 2018 and 29 September 2021 (inclusive).

You do not need to have spent 821 days in New Zealand consecutively. And there is no minimum amount of days within a calendar year.

You may request your travel movement summary from Immigration New Zealand if you do not know whether or not you have spent 821 days in New Zealand between 29 September 2018 and 29 September 2021 New Zealand.

We are able to request your travel movement summary on your behalf.

Do I earn at or above the median wage?

You must be paid the median wage of NZD $27 per hour or above on 29 September 2021.

If your pay increased to $27 per hour after 29 September 2021, it’s tough luck.

As well as earning at or above the median wage, do I have to be working full time (i.e. 30 or more hours per week)?

We do not know, however, more information will be available at the end of October.

Do I work in a role on a scarce list?

You must work in a job that is on a scarce list on 29 September 2021. The scarce lists are:

When will I be able to apply?

From 1 December 2021, you can apply if:

  • you have already applied for residence under the Skilled Migrant and Residence from Work categories (e.g Long Term Skill Shortage List Resident Visa) before 29 September 2021; or
  • you have submitted a Skilled Migrant Category Expression of Interest, and have included your dependent child in the Expression of Interest aged 17 years or older before or on 29 September 2021.

From 1 March 2022, all other eligible applicants can apply, including all others who have submitted a Skilled Migrant Category Expression of Interest.

All applications must be made by 31 July 2022.

What is the processing time?

We do not yet know, but the Minister of Immigration has said “The application process for the 2021 Resident Visa is simplified to deal with applications as quickly as possible. … The one-off arrangement for the new 2021 Resident Visa would see the majority of applications granted within a year of the category opening.”

Am I able to include my partner and/or dependent(s) in my application?

You may include your partner and/or dependents(s), whether they are in New Zealand or overseas, in your 2021 Resident Visa application.

How much will Immigration New Zealand charge to process my application?

More information will be available by the end of October. We will be able to let you know then.

Because it is a simplified pathway to residence, will I still have meet character and health requirements?

The Minister of Immigration has said, “Applicants will still need to meet health requirements and pass police and security checks, as is required under the current residence application process.”

However, overseas police certificates will not be required unless specifically requested by an Immigration Officer. Limited medical certificates and chest x-ray certificates may be required for some people. Immigration New Zealand may request further information as part of the application process.

What will the application process be like? Will I be able to apply online?

Applications can be submitted online.

What about the Skilled Migrant Category? When will that be reopened?

To prioritise processing of the 2021 Resident Visa, selections from the Skilled Migrant Category Expressions of Interest pool will remain closed until the 2021 Resident Visa closes on 31 July 2022.

Have questions that we have not answered? Please contact us on 03 348 8480 or by email to Viv Zhang – VivZhang@parryfield.com and Rebecca Nicholson – RebeccaNicholson@parryfield.com.

If you would be interested in attending a seminar in relation to the 2021 Resident Visa, please email Joanne Li –  JoannelLi@parryfield.com.

Please note that this is not a substitute for legal advice and you should contact Parry Field Lawyers or your lawyer about your specific situation.

2021 居民签证——您的问题得到解答!

2021 年 9 月 30 日,移民部长宣布了一项“一次性”和“简化的居留途径”——2021 年居民签证。

我合符资格吗?

要获得 2021 年居民签证,您必须:

  • 2021 年 9 月 29 日在新西兰——我们注意到那些在 2021 年 9 月 29 日之前无法返回新西兰的澳大利亚人也可能合符资格;并且
  • 持有符合条件的签证或在 2021 年 9 月 29 日或之前已经申请符合条件的签证,且该签证后来获得批准。

同时您还必须:

  • 在新西兰居住三年或以上;或者
  • 收入等于或高于工资中位数(每小时 $27.00 );或者
  • 在稀缺名单上工作。

您必须满足上述三个标准之一——您不必同时满足所有三个标准。

我有符合条件的签证吗?

如果您的签证是以下其中一种,那么是符合条件的:

  • 毕业后开发性工作签证;
  • 优才(认可雇主)工作签证;
  • 技能工作签证;
  • 宗教工作者工作签证;
  • 优才(艺术、文化、体育)工作签证;
  • 长期短缺工作签证;
  • 签证南岛贡献工作签证;
  • Silver Fern 实践经验工作签证;
  • 贩卖受害者工作签证;
  • 移民剥削保护工作签证;
  • 技术移民类求职工作签证;
  • 家庭暴力工作的受害者;
  • 根据第 61 条授予的工作签证(前提是您在获得第 61 条签证之前的 6 个月内持有另一种符合条件的签证类型);和
  • 关键目的访客签证 (CPVV),如果:

o 您是长期(6 个月或更长时间)的关键卫生工作者;和

o 您是其他长期超过 6 个月)的关键工作人员。

如果您持有的是短期或季节性职位关键目的访客签证,或者您持有的是以下其中一种签证,那么您将不符合资格申请居留签证:

  • 旅游签证;
  • 学生签证;
  • 打工度假签证;
  • 季节性签证(例如认可的季节性雇主有限签证);或者
  • 配偶类工作签证。

我是否在新西兰居住了三年或更长时间?

如果您符合以下条件,那么您在过去三年或更长时间内在新西兰居住:

  • 2018 年 9 月 29 日或之前抵达新西兰;并且
  • 2018 年 9 月 29 日至 2021 年 9 月 29 日(含)期间在新西兰逗留至少 821 天。

您无需连续在新西兰待 821 天。并且在一个日历年内没有最少天数的限制。

如果您不知道您是否在 2018 年 9 月 29 日至 2021 年 9 月 29 日期间在新西兰度过了 821 天,您可以向新西兰移民局索取您的出入境记录。

我们可以代表您索取您的出入境记录。

您的收入是否等于或高于工资中位数?

您必须在 2021 年 9 月 29 日获得每小时 27 新西兰元或以上的工资中位数。

如果您的工资在 2021 年 9 月 29 日之后才增加到每小时 27 新西兰元,那就太倒霉了。

除了收入等于或高于中位数工资外,我是否必须全职工作(即每周工作 30 小时或更多小时)?

我们暂时不知道,但是,更多信息将在 10 月底提供。

我是否在稀缺名单上工作?

在 2021 年 9 月 29 日, 您必须已经从事稀缺名单上的工作。稀缺名单是:

  • 长期短缺清单;和
  • “需要在卫生或教育部门进行职业注册”清单;和
  • “个人护理人员和其他重要卫生工作者” 清单;和
  • 主要部门工作清单。

FOR EMAIL – 请看附件。

我什么时候可以递交申请?

如果您符合以下情况之一,就可以在2021 年 12 月 1 日开始递交申请:

  • 您已经在 2021 年 9 月 29 日之前递交了技术移民申请或工作居留类别下的居留申请(例如长期技能短缺清单居民签证);或者
  • 您已经提交了技术移民类别的意向书,并且在 2021 年 9 月 29 日或之前已将您的17 岁或以上的受抚养子女包括在您的意向书中。

从 2022 年 3 月 1 日起,所有其他符合条件的申请人都可以递交申请,包括提交了技术移民类别意向书的其他所有人。

所有申请必须在 2022 年 7 月 31 日之前提交。

申请处理时间是多久?

我们还不知道,但移民部长已表示:“简化了 2021 年居民签证的申请流程,以尽快处理申请。 ……新的 2021 年居民签证的一次性安排将使大多数申请在类别开放后的一年内获得批准。”

我可以在我的申请中包括我的伴侣和/或受抚养子女吗?

您可以在您的 2021 居民签证申请中包括您的伴侣和/或受抚养子女,无论他们在新西兰还是海外。

新西兰移民局将收取多少费用来处理我的申请?

更多信息将在 10 月底提供。届时我们会通知您。

因为它是一种简化的居住途径,我是否仍然符合性格和健康要求?

移民部长表示:“申请人仍需要满足健康要求,并通过警察和安全检查,这是目前居留申请程序所要求的。”

但是,除非移民官特别要求,否则不需要海外无犯罪证明。某些申请人可能需要提供有限的医疗证明和胸部 X 光证明。作为申请过程的一部分,新西兰移民局可能会要求提供更多信息。

申请流程是怎样的?我可以网上申请吗?

申请可以网上提交。

技术移民类别呢?那什么时候会重新开放?

为了优先处理 2021 居民签证,池中的技术移民类别意向书选择将继续关闭,直到 2021 居民签证于 2022 年 7 月 31 日关闭。

还有我们尚未回答的问题?请致电 03 348 8480 或发送电子邮件至 Viv Zhang – VivZhang@parryfield.com 和 Rebecca Nicholson – RebeccaNicholson@parryfield.com 与我们联系。

如果您有兴趣参加有关 2021 年居民签证的研讨会,请发送电子邮件至 Joanne Li – JoannelLi@parryfield.com。

请注意,以上不能代替法律建议,您应该就您的具体情况联系 Parry Field Lawyers 或您的律师。

As you will know, the New Zealand border is closed to almost all travellers to protect New Zealanders from COVID-19.

However, with a Critical Purpose Visitor Visa, a person is able to:

  • travel to New Zealand even though the New Zealand border is closed; and
  • stay in New Zealand between 6 and 12 months

To be granted a Critical Purpose Visitor Visa, the applicant must:

  • be in good health;
  • be of good character i.e. not been convicted of an offence;
  • genuinely intend to meet the conditions of a Critical Purpose Visitor Visa i.e. only intend to stay in New Zealand temporarily, will not stay in New Zealand

without a valid visa etc.; and

  • have a critical purpose for being in New Zealand.

Critical purpose for being in New Zealand

A person will have a critical purpose for being in New Zealand if they are a, for example:

  • partner or dependent child of a New Zealand citizen or resident without a relationship-based visa;
  • partner or dependent child of a temporary visa holder who is employed a teacher in New Zealand;
  • partner or dependent child of a temporary visa holder who held a visa for New Zealand, but were unable to join their partner or parent in New Zealand before

the border closed;

  • partner and dependent children of a temporary visa who is employed in a critical health; service
  • critical health worker;
  • other critical worker;
  • citizen of Samoa and Tonga who have been asked by their government to travel here, and this travel has been approved by The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and

Trade;

  • humanitarian exception;
  • replacement cargo ship crew arriving by air; and
  • ship crew arriving by sea.

The humanitarian exception

Humanitarian reasons are exceptional circumstances of a humanitarian nature that make it strongly desirable for the applicant to travel and enter New Zealand. When considering whether a person has humanitarian reasons for travelling to New Zealand, an immigration officer must consider the strong public interest in protecting the health of New Zealanders and supporting Government agencies’ response to the risks posed by the COVID-19 situation.

Relevant factors when considering if humanitarian reasons justify the grant of a visa include:

  • the applicant’s connection to New Zealand;
  • the applicant’s connection to the place they are currently located;
  • whether New Zealand is their primary place of residence, and their period of absence from New Zealand;
  • whether the applicant has any alternative options; and
  • the impact of not granting a visa and entry permission to the applicant.

It is a very high threshold – the person’s situation has to be “well outside the normal run of circumstances”, and it will not be enough that the person’s circumstances are emotionally upsetting or cause family members in New Zealand difficulty or hardship.

Please note that this is not a substitute for legal advice and you should contact your lawyer about your specific situation. Please feel free to contact us on 03 348 8480 or by email to Viv Zhang – VivZhang@parryfield.com and Rebecca Nicholson – RebeccaNicholson@parryfield.com.

Accredited Employer Work Visa

The Accredited Employer Work Visa (“AEWV”) was to replace six temporary work visa categories on 1 November 2021:

  • Essential Skills Work Visa;
  • Essential Skills Work Visa – Approval in Principle;
  • Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa;
  • Long Term Skills Shortage List Work Visa;
  • Silver Fern Job Search Visa; and
  • Silver Fern Practical Experience Visa.

However, the introduction of the AEWV has been delayed until mid-2022.

Before hiring a migrant on the Accredited Employer Work Visa, an employer will need to:

  1. apply for accreditation under the new system – “the Employer Check”;
  2. apply for a job check to make sure the role they want to fill cannot be done by New Zealanders – “the Job Check”/”the Labour Market Test”; and
  3. request a migrant worker to apply for a visa – “the Worker Check”.

Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa

To be able to apply for a Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa:

  • The employer must be an accredited employer; and
  • The applicant will have to be paid at least NZD $79,560 per year (before tax).

Under the Talent (Accredited Employer) Category, there is a pathway to residence. A Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa holder may apply for residence if:

  • they have been employed by an accredited employer for at least 24 months; and
  • they earn:
    • at least $55,000 a year; or
    • at least $79,560 a year if they applied for their Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa on or after 7 October 2019.

The Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa was one of the six temporary work visa categories to be replaced on 1 November 2021 by the AEWV. However, while the introduction of the AEWV has been delayed to mid-2022:

  • The Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa will be phased out on 1 November 2021, and as such, will close to any new applications on 31 October 2021; and
  • The last day for an employer to apply for accreditation (for the Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa) was 30 June 2021.

So:

  • if an employer is not accredited, but would like to be; or
  • if an employer is accredited and would like to employ new migrants between 1 November 2021 and mid-2022 under the Talent (Accredited Employer) Category;

it’s tough luck – no can do!

The pathway to residence for a Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa holder, however, will be maintained after 1 November 2021. So, Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa holders will be able to apply for residence after 1 November 2021 as long as they meet their Visa conditions.

Essential Skills Work Visa

Whilst the Talent (Accredited Employer) will close to any new migrants on 31 October 2021, a person will be able to apply for an Essential Skills Work Visa (“ESWV”) until the AEWV is introduced in mid-2022.

To apply for an ESWV, the employer must have determined that there are any no New Zealand citizens or residents available to do the work offered (i.e. the Labour Market Test), except, for example:

  • If the job is on one of the Skill Shortages Lists/Essential Skills in Demand Lists and the applicant is able to meet the qualification and/or work experience
    requirements listed.

INZ will also require a Skills Match Report if, for example, the applicant will paid below the median wage (which at the moment is $27 per hour) and the role is not undersupplied.

Unlike the Talent (Accredited Employer) Work Visa, with the ESWV there is no employer accreditation requirement and no pathway to residence.

Changes were made to the ESWV settings on 19 July 2021 to:

  • Extend the maximum duration from 12 to 24 months when paid below the median wage (which at the moment is $27 per hour);
    • The duration when paid the median wage or above has not changed – it is three years;
  • Where the applicant is remaining in their current full time employment and not changing their role, employer or region of work, not require:
    • A Labour Market Test (nor Skills Match Report) if the applicant is a holder of a:
      • Any type of work visa (including a Working Holiday Visa);
      • A student visa that has unlimited work rights (i.e. to study Masters or PhD degree); or
      • A Critical Purpose Visitor Visa granted as a critical health worker, or granted for more than six months as an “other critical worker”;
    • An Employment Agreement;
    • Evidence of the applicant’s qualification(s), work experience and/or occupational registration;
  • Not require a Medical Certificate and/or Chest X-ray Certificate if they were previously supplied with a Visa application, even if they were provided more than
    36 months ago.
  • Not require a Police Certificate(s) if they were previously supplied with a Visa application, even if they were provided more than 24 months ago.

Please note that this is not a substitute for legal advice and you should contact your lawyer about your specific situation. Please feel free to contact us on 03 348 8480 or by email to Viv Zhang – VivZhang@parryfield.com and Rebecca Nicholson – RebeccaNicholson@parryfield.com.

Business can be complicated but it doesn’t have to be.  We have helped thousands of clients and know about the key legal areas that will affect you and have just released our fully revised and updated “Doing Business in New Zealand” free handbook.  You can download it here.

New Zealand consistently ranks as one of the most business-friendly nations in the world. Given this appealing status and the interest we receive both from local and international investors, as well as form businesses and entrepreneurs, we produced the “Doing Business in New Zealand” handbook a few years ago and now have fully updated it.  It is intended to introduce and provide information for those who may be unfamiliar with how business is done here. The handbook provides introduction on business structures, investment rules, employment, disputes, property, intellectual property, immigration, privacy and social enterprise, just to name a few examples.

If you have further enquires please contact Steven Moe at stevenmoe@parryfield.com or on 021 761 292 or Kris Morrison at krismorrison@parryfield.com.

Be sure to check out our other free guides too, such as Startups: Legal Toolkit and Social Enterprises in New Zealand: A Legal Handbook.  We also provide free templates for resolutions, Non Disclosure Agreements and other resources on our site as well as many articles on key topics you should know about.

本事务所于1948年创立于基督城,面向社会提供范围广泛的法律服务。

我们致力于挑战大众对于律师工作方式的固有成见

-与其被动回应,我们更希望能积极主动地与您协作。

我们拥有超过30人的专业法律团队,服务范围涵盖如下领域:

• 咨询:公司企业经营,商业并购及买卖,国际合同与海外投资。

• 房地产:住宅买卖,商业租赁,土地分割开发。

• 争议及诉讼:商业及个人纠纷诉讼,保险及EQC理赔代理。

• 个人事务:雇佣关系,移民申请,信托,遗嘱及不动产。

与此同时,我们还拥有针对专门领域的专家队伍。例如农业法律团队专注向农场主和农业地区提供法律服务,科技团队专注于向IT行业及创新领域提供法律服务,另外还有由4名华语母语及2名精通日语的工作人员组成的亚洲团队。

如果您有任何法律问题需要咨询,期待您与我们联系。我们设于Riccarton区的总部,以及City,Rolleston和Hokitika地区的分部随时欢迎您的来电来访。

更多信息请致信 www.parryfield.com 或致电: 03 348 8480
ext 319 张云霞(Vivienne)主任律师 ext 327 涂唐莉(Doris)主任律师
ext 340 蔡贞翎(Irene) 律师
ext 318 李翠姬(Joanne)法律秘书 刘萍(Yuki) 法律秘书

 

 当事務所は1948年クライストチャーチに創立され 以来、広範な法律サービスを提供させていただいて  おります。

弁護士を少しでも身近な存在だと感じていただけるように努力しています。

クライアント様のご要望にお応えできるように、最善を尽くします。

30人以上のチームをもち、以下のサービスを提供しています:

  • アドバイサリー: 会社及び企業事務、事業の買収及び売却、インターナショナルな契約及び海外投資
  • プロパティ: 住宅販売, 商業賃貸, 不動産分割.
  • 争議:Court work 裁判所関連事務及び会社や個人訴訟, 保険及び EQC 関連訴訟.
  • 個人業務: 雇用契約, 移住(ビザ申請), 信託, 遺言 & 不動産.

更に、専門性を有するチームによって専門領域の問題を解決する仕組みになっています。例えば、農場経営及び農村地域に関するサービスを提供することに特化したチームや、技術チームによってIT関連及び立ち上げ事業サービスを提供します。その上、4名の中国語話者と2名の日本語話者のメンバーで構成したアジアチームも あります。

2名の日本語話者の中、Steven Moeは弁護士として4年間東京の法律事務所に務め、その後英語教師として大阪で1年間滞在したことがあります (stevenmoe@parryfield.com)。Yuki Liuは茨城県で日本語を習得し、元日本パナソニック社員です(yuki.liu@parryfield.com)。

法律問題をお持ちの方々、いつでも相談窓口に来てください。事務所本部はRiccarton におり、他にCityやRolleston 、Hokitikaにもオフィスを設置しております

お問い合わせ先: メールwww.parryfield.com 電話: 03 348 8480.

 

 

Some key information, steps and points to get right in your planning if you want to move to New Zealand

If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there. Lewis Carroll

There is a lot of uncertainty around the world today. One only has to look at the examples of Brexit, terrorism and terrorist attacks in formerly safe places, political changes and financial instability and lack of confidence over the future.

In this climate, many people are looking at better options for them and their families. Where is somewhere safe that speaks English and has a similar culture and a stable political system as well as natural beauty and a good lifestyle?  New Zealand ticks those boxes so is always on most people’s radar.

My own family came here when I was a child and, after 12 years overseas, I have just moved my young family back for the same lifestyle, stability and financial reasons that motivate many others. We are not regretting our decision to move to Christchurch at this time.

This article provides an outline of key points to be thinking about if you are considering moving to New Zealand.

  1. New Zealand has a relatively low population compared to many other countries. Right now the population is around 4.5 million with the total likely to reach 5 million in the mid 2020s. About 3 out of 4 New Zealanders live in the North Island.
  2. New Zealand welcomes immigrants – but there is a ranking of priority which often comes down to the financial contribution an immigrant can make. This is important when considering the key investor categories which are the following:-
    • Entrepreneur visa: You need to be an experienced business person who wants to buy or establish a business with a minimum investment of NZ $100,000 (higher investment amounts increase the chance of a successful application), among other requirements;
    • Investor category visa: You need to bring NZ $1.5 million to invest (and again higher investment amounts increase the chance of a successful application) and meet certain criteria; and
    • Investor plus category visa: You need to bring NZ $10 million to invest to meet this threshold.
  3. Whatever visa is applied for both health and character requirements will be applicable to the immigration process.
  4. If you get a visa and come to live in New Zealand and are here for 5 years then you can apply for citizenship and once granted you have full access to rights as a citizen.
  5. Setting up a company in New Zealand is straightforward and can be done quickly as long as it has at least one director living in New Zealand (or Australia, subject to certain conditions). As well as companies there are other structures commonly used and we can advise on those options – for example, many people also set up family trusts or other ways to hold assets.
  6. The tax rates in New Zealand are adjusted depending on how much you earn. For example between $0-$14,000 the tax rate is 10.5 cents on the dollar, between $14,001-$48,000 is 17.5 cents, between $48,000-$70,000 is 30 cents and $70,001 and above is 33 cents.
  7. You need to apply to the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) for a tax number which will identify you for tax purposes. When making the move consider retaining the services of a tax accountant and other professionals in your home country so they can assist in the transition period as you move from one jurisdiction to another.
  8. If you have kids then it is good to know that the education system is world class with well established and ranked world leading universities in all the major centres. Remember the scale here is different so there is a total of 8 universities in the whole country.
  9. Remember the practical point that New Zealand is far away from the rest of the world. Only about 12% of the entire population of the world lives in the Southern Hemisphere and New Zealand is about as far away as you can get. The benefits of that are obvious as it is insulated in many ways from many of the negative things going on elsewhere in the world. But at the same time it is a series of long flights for loved ones to make to visit and that should not be overlooked when making a decision to move here.
  10. Auckland is the largest city (more than a million) but the regions should not be overlooked. For example, Christchurch is booming now with the rebuild in full swing and new infrastructure being built everywhere you look.  Both surfing beaches and snow skiing both within easy reach.  You can also get credits in the Visa application if you are moving to a region and house prices are also more reasonable than Auckland with.

As the quote at the start says, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there”. Hopefully the ideas set out above will help with some of your thinking about moving to New Zealand. If we can be of any assistance with your thought processes and looking at what options may suit your situation then please let us know and we would be happy to assist.

We have also prepared a detailed guide called “Doing Business in New Zealand” which has an overview about the New Zealand business environment.  We are happy to emailthat out to those who would find it of help.

Steven Moe
Senior Associate
Parry Field Lawyers
stevenmoe@parryfield.com